Children adore the Suzy and Karrit picture book series!

These books entertain and encourage children to discover how to make friends and banish bedtime monsters at will...

Two of the books inspire children to write their own story, using empowering artwork

When a child writes a story that addresses a vexing problem (such as banishing bedtime monsters or making a good friend) they come up with a solution that they totally believe. This helps them put aside the issue and enjoy life.

When they share their story with parents, grandparents, teachers and other adults who can provide encouragement to them, their beliefs are reinforced and their self confidence and self esteem grow.

Alan H. Jordan received a grant from the Nevada Arts Council to defray the cost of writing The Monster on Top of the Bed because of the book's ability to help children prosper.Because children learn in different ways, the books in the Suzy and Karrit series come in different editions--printed; CD/booklet; electronic (Kindle, iPad, etc.); audio (English, Spanish and Italian). In fact, I received a grant from the Nevada Arts Council to defray some of the costs of creating The Monster on Top of the Bed because of the book's potential to help children prosper.

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Children write their own story
and put their names on the cover and title page. (Get one for each child.)
The picture book
featuring the story that I wrote and Maneula Pentangelo's superb artwork.
My Monster + The Monster combined with
a lower total cost.(Child's story first.)

My Monster on Top of the Bed and The Monster on Top of the Bed: Creative Edition encourage children to write their own story, drawing inspiration from the same empowering artwork that is used to illustrate The Monster on Top of the Bed, a book that has been delighting children since 2008.

Think of a Disney Movie or a Fairy Tale, With an Added Twist

Once upon a time there was a little girl named Suzy, who used to jump up and down on her bed having just a great time. This scared a young critter named Karrit who lived under Suzy’s bed and he wanted her to be his friend. Still, Suzy ate strange things like cakes made out of pans (pancakes) and the toes of toemays (tomatoes) and—he couldn’t believe it—he heard her talk about eating something truly horrendous.

One day Karrit heard Suzy tell her mother that she was lonely and needed a friend. Because of that Karrit decided to visit Suzy. At first Suzy was afraid of Karrit, who had red, scaly legs, and a blue nose. But Suzy noticed that Karrit seemed scared of her too. So, Suzy treated Karrit the way that she would want to be treated if she had gone to his house.

As they grew to know each other, Suzy figured out why Karrit was afraid of her, and she was sorry to have scared him. She showed him a hotdog (she didn’t eat dogs that were hot) a tomato (she didn’t eat the toes of matoes) and a carrot (she definitely didn’t eat Karrits).

Suzy made Karrit feel that she liked him, and that she wanted him to be happy. Because of that, they kept getting to know each other better until one day they both realized that they didn’t have to be afraid of each other, and that it was a mistake for each of them to think of the other as a “monster.” Suzy and Karrit became best friends, and neither was afraid of monsters again.

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